People and societies act on presuppositions – basic facts that are held to be self-evident and thus immune to questioning. And while presuppositions vary from culture to culture, there seems to be at least one universal, foundational principle in this modern world: that God, if He exists, is not at all interested in what we do. This, despite repeated assurances by God Himself to the contrary.

Thus the Chinese government tears down churches and jails pastors without batting an eye, Boko Haram butchers Christians with impunity, the United States insists on flagrantly violating God’s laws, to the point of – but by no means limited to – sacrificing the unborn on the altar of economic efficiency, and here in Brazil a Carnaval parade features a float picturing Christ in a way that can only be described as deeply insulting.

These and many other examples indicate a worldwide consensus that God cannot do anything about any of this, or, if able, He is for some reason unwilling.

So, for the sake of review, let’s take a look at what God can do.

He can bring the most powerful empires to their knees.
He can instantly wipe out vast fortunes.
He can make powerful, multinational companies stare into the abyss of bankruptcy.
He can cause the the most powerful men in the world to cower inside their houses.
He can turn great cities into vacant wastelands.
He can confound and confuse the scientific community.
He can make the press lose any credibility it may have once had.
He can silence the sports and entertainment industries.
He can disrupt international trade and travel.
He can make liberals clamor for closed borders.
He can make conservatives cry out for government intervention.
He can close down abortion clinics without the help a single Supreme Court Justice.
He can, in one day, inundate social media with the Gospel, leaving the world without excuse.

He can do it all in two weeks, using something so small it can only be seen with a microscope.

It might be time to revisit our modern presuppositions.

Banner image: Destruction by British/American painter Thomas Cole, part of this Course of Empire series.

 

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